Advertisement

How Many Calories Did You Burn Today?

When it comes to leisure time, children today have many options. Unfortunately, according to new studies, more and more American kids are choosing couch-bound activities that require little more than the energy to work a remote control or joystick. Computers, TV and video games command four or more hours of a typical child’s day—a primary reason why kids today are much less active than even 10 or 20 years ago.

This upswing in sedentary activities—coupled with overeating and poor food quality—is being blamed for the rising number of overweight children in this country. Equally unsettling, overweight or obese kids are at increased risk of hypertension, Type 2 diabetes, orthopedic problems, upper respiratory infections, heart disease and severe asthma.


So what can you do to curb this alarming trend? For starters, peel your couch potatoes off the sofa and get them moving. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says that school-age children need at least two hours of exercise a day. (Toddlers and preschoolers require no less than 60 minutes a day of unstructured movement and physical activity time; adults should get an hour of moderate to vigorous exercise every day.)


Here, we offer a chart detailing the number of calories burned during certain activities. Calories burned per hour are listed below for the example body weights of 70, 100, 130, 155, 175 and 200 pounds. 
    





















































































































































































































































nter>Activity (1 hour)


nter>70 lbs.


nter>100 lbs.


nter>130 lbs


nter>155 lbs


nter>175 lbs.


nter>200 lbs.


Aerobics, general workout


nter>189


nter>270


nter>354


nter>419


nter>473


nter>540

Backpacking
nter>189


nter>270


nter>354




align=center>419


align=center>473


align=center>540

Basketball (half-court)
align=center>189


align=center>270


align=center>354


align=center>419


align=center>473


align=center>540

Bicycling (on a flat surface)
align=center>206


align=center>294


align=center>413


align=center>456


align=center>515


align=center>588

Dancing
align=center>160


align=center>228


align=center>325


align=center>353


align=center>399


align=center>456

Frisbee
align=center>101


align=center>144


align=center>177


align=center>216


align=center>252


align=center>288

Gardening
align=center>151


align=center>216


align=center>295


align=center>324


align=center>378


align=center>432

Golfing (without a cart)
align=center>122


align=center>174


align=center>236


align=center>261


align=center>305


align=center>348

Hiking
align=center>193


align=center>276


align=center>354


align=center>414


align=center>483


align=center>552

Jogging
align=center>315


align=center>450


align=center>585


align=center>698


align=center>788


align=center>900

Mowing the lawn (push mower)
align=center>151


align=center>216


align=center>281


align=center>335


align=center>378


align=center>432

Playing the piano
align=center>88




126


164


195


221


252

Preparing dinner

69


98


128


153


172


197

Raking the lawn

160


228


296


353


399


456

Rope jumping

319


456


593


707


798


912

Shoveling snow

189


270


351


419


473


540

Snow skiing (cross-country)

256


366


476


567


640


732

Snow skiing (downhill)

205


294


382


456


515


588

Soccer

218


312


406


484


546


624

Sweeping the floor

79


113


147


175


197


226

Tennis (singles)

256


366


476


567


641


732

Tennis (doubles)

160


228


296


353


399


456

Vaccuming

79


113


147


175


197


226

Walking, with a dog

139


198


258


307


347


396

Walking, pushing a stroller

139


198


258


307


347


396

Washing dishes

71


102


133


158


179


204

Watching TV

34


48


62


74


84


96

Working out at the gym

176


252


328


391


441


504

Yoga

168


240


312


372


420


480


Note: Figures are based on moderate (as opposed to vigorous) activity. A heavier person burns more calories, so the same amount of physical activity can actually burn the same number of calories but more quickly. But remember, exercising harder and faster only increases the calories expended slightly. To burn more calories it is better to exercise for a longer time.

Determining how many calories you burn is not an exact science. This number should only be used as an estimate of calorie expenditure.


 
Source: The Calorie Control Council






Return to our Special Report on Overweight Children.

 

Advertisment