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Be a Sun Smarty!

Sun SmartyADVERTORIAL


Most children rack up between 50% and 80% of their lifetime sun exposure before age 18, so it's important that we teach our kids how to enjoy fun in the sun safely. 

Answer these 5 questions and find out how much you really know about protecting your family  from the the sun's damaging rays.


1. Should babies wear sunscreen?


2. Does a cotton t-shirt protect my child?


3. Does sunscreen have a shelf life?


4. Can you get sunburn on a cloudy day?


5. Can my eyes get sunburned? 


6. What are the effects of the interaction of my childs medication and sun exposure?




1. Should babies wear sunscreen?

 Yes. Years ago, sunscreen contained PABA, which was not recommended for the babies’ skin; nowadays there are unique products that are orientated toward babies.  Just be careful to rub the sunscreen in well, babies have a tendency to rub there eyes and put there hands in there mouth. Dr. suggest that you not apply any sunscreen the first 6 months.
 
2. Does a cotton t-shirt protect my child?

No! A 100% cotton t-shirt has as little as 5%UV protection and even less when wet. Keep in mind that the tighter the weave or knit in the fabric the better the protection.
 

3. Does sunscreen have a shelf life?

Not generally, but most sunscreens have an expiry date. Check the date stamped on the bottle.

4. Can you get sunburn on a cloudy day?

Absolutely. Although a heavily clouded sky does reduce the UV rays, scattered clouds can reflect and even increase their intensity.



5. Can my eyes get sunburned?

Yes, sun exposure damages the eyes as well as the skin. Even 1 day in the sun can result in a burned cornea (the outermost, clear membrane layer of the eye). Cumulative exposure can lead to cataracts later in life (clouding of the eye lens, which results in blindness). The best way to protect eyes is to wear sunglasses, start your kids early.



6. What are the effects of the interaction of my childs medication and sun exposure?

Some medications increase the skin's sensitivity to UV rays. As a result, even kids with skin that tends not to burn easily can develop severe sunburn in just minutes when taking certain medications.  Ask your doctor or pharmacist if the prescription (especially antibiotics and acne medications) and over-the-counter medications your child is taking can increase sun sensitivity




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